Wednesday, February 10, 2010

DON'T USE PLASTIC CONTAINERS IN YOUR MICROWAVE

New health warnings say you should not heat food in plastic containers or with plastic wrap. Some of the plastic chemicals will get in the food and into your body. We use 1930s covered glass refrigerator containers.





16 comments:

Helen said...

I love those 1930's refrigerator containers, but I did not know that you could use them in the microwave. I use them for making Jello! Can anyone tell me about dishwasher safety, uses, etc?

Sandi Lee said...

If the glass is warm/hot to the touch after being in the microwave it IS NOT suitable for microwaving. The glass may crack or worse, explode! Usually Pyrex glass is 'okay'. Also old glass should NOT be placed in a automatic dishwater - it is not the heat of the water, but the chemical reaction of the electric dishwasher detergent and the hot water.

Alice said...

This is a false warning!!
http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/cookplastic.asp

Anonymous said...

You should use caution with older glass items in a microwave. Some glass containers (I believe they had a colored layer on the outside & clear lids) that had been my moms (50s-60s era) did crack/explode. No idea on brand. It could possibly relate to temperature change.

Marie

Anonymous said...

Is it safe to use the green depression glass refirgerator covered dishes in Microwave? Is there not Uranium in the glass?

Lynne said...

My rule is: never subject any item to technology that hadn't yet been invented when it was made.

Any potential health risk aside, 1930's refrigerator are so much cooler than plastic containers!

Helen said...

Thank you. I have been avoiding heating food in plastic, and it is a pain.

I think I will still use glass when I can, and I still want to know other uses for the 1930s refrigerator dishes besides storing and serving jello and other cold foods.

Marsha said...

why risk it? Use Tupperware microwavable containers, which do not contain polycarbons & are also dishwasher safe. Only microwave the ones that are specifically for the microwave tho.

DONNA said...

I thought this was a disturbing comment as we consume a large amount of food items that are packaged in plastic and have microwave cooking instructions. I searched webmd.com
and found this to be totally false.
Any food packaging company that wants to put their food in plastic must pass muster with the FDA first.
Please don't let people send out these ignorant warnings.

Miko102 said...

I have used plastic containers and plastic wrap to heat my food in the microwave. What damage have I done to my body by doing this. Can you be more specific as to your comment about using these two items for heating food in the microwave.

Anonymous said...

I really appreciate Kovels Komments' efforts to keep readers alert to updated health warnings, but wish that Kovels Komments would check out warnings such as this before posting them to subscribers, and cite your sources rather than just saying "new health warnings". It would save subscribers from unfounded fear, as well as time spent trying to find the supportive evidence. This particular warning has been noted as an urban legend for several years.

Lynne said...

Personal experience has taught me NOT to use old glass in the microwave. It may not crack the first time you use it but as it is older, it will eventually break. save your antiques or collectible items and use the newer glass ones made for that purpose.

Anonymous said...

I had leftovers in an old refrigerator container (the style with embossed fruit on the top) and put them directly from the fridge to the micro. BAD idea! The lid broke into large pieces along the deeper embossed lines of the fruit. Could have been the shock from cold to hot.

paul said...

This warning is somewhat puffery as original food to be cooked for a decent time comes in plastic. Some varieties of plastic may be less stable, but not all plastic. As both plastic and paper use less energy than ceramics when using the microwave, reusing the black plastic bowls is both green and safe, or use paper plates that can be reused (washed).

Don't trust the internet for vague and unsubstantiated health warnings as it is often a hoax or hysterical puffery. Research, not testimony.

Also a good plastic to reuse is market bags for pre-wrapping antiques. The plastic prevents scratching and other problems from the additional paper protection.

Anonymous said...

Do some old glass containers contain lead? I love them and would love to use them for the microwave also but have been uncertain.

Beth Cherkowsky said...

NEVER EVER microwave old depression glass - it was never meant to be used for that (I mean microwaves just don't go back that far, come on!) It can crack the first time or the 199th time

As for plastic, it has been repeatedly warned not to use plastic that is not marked as microwave safe - and plastic wrap in particular undergoes changes in the heating and becomes less than wonderful.

why bother? a piece of paper towel or a paper plate? or buy MICROWAVE SAFE glass/china, cripes they even have it at the dollar store these days.