Wednesday, March 11, 2009

WWII TEAPOT MARK

World War II Q: This teapot was given to me by someone who said these were given to soldiers during World War II. Is this true?

A: Teapots similar to yours were made during World War II, but not for the soldiers, who were much too busy for tea. They were made to raise money for the war effort. The teapots we have seen are black, like yours, and are decorated with flowers. A few were made in a smaller size. The words "For England and Democracy" are usually printed around the lid. Teapots with the words "Escorted to U.S.A. by Royal Navy" were also made. From 1939 until the end of the war in 1945, ships crossing the Atlantic were protected by Allied escort ships from the United States, Canada and England. The mark on the bottom of the teapot is the Staffordshire knot, indicating the pottery was made by one of the Staffordshire potteries. There is probably more to this story. Can anyone tell us more?


11 comments:

Anonymous said...

From my friend in the UK, comes this website which has information about the Stafford Knot and potteries: The Potteries

Anonymous said...

Not a comment, but a question: is the black color a black glaze, or a basalt ware?

Anonymous said...

Not a comment, but a question: is the black color a black glaze, or a basalt ware?

Sweater's Pram said...

You are wrong in your comment 'the soldiers were to busy to make tea.' The British 'Tommy' was well known for his love of a 'cuppa' and would brew up whenever an opportunity arose! There is a classic photo of a tank crew in the North African campaign against Rommel making tea in the shelter of their tank. I even had one veteran show me how they did it as they had no tea-pot!

Anonymous said...

One more link, from another friend in the UK: someone at Ruby Lane has one for sale HERE although I note they call theirs a "Rockingham" knot, fwiw.

Anonymous said...

My teapot has a teapot shape card which was attached that says, "This English Rockingham Teapot was manufactured in The Midlands by courageous British women, replacing men who are employed in the defense of their country. The sale of these Teapots in America establishes further credit to apply against the purchases of war material." The lid is marked, "For England and Democracy" in gold lettering. The mark on the bottom is the same as pictured. An identy mark in orange is 5983 with some dots.

Anonymous said...

I never noticed that "World War II" was referred to in that way during the war itself. I wonder when was the first use of the term?

lee@lindumsteephill.com said...

The United States and Canada launched many convoys made up of numerous ships carrying very heavy cargoes. Once off-loaded, these vessels required substantial ballast for their return journeys which, of course, would not be militarily useful. Large amounts of English pottery and porcelain were shipped and sold in the United States and Canada to raise income for the British economy. Have you ever wondered why there is so much English china in this country with manufacturing dates from the 1930s?

Anonymous said...

how much are they worth i have one that is the same as her/she said it looks like and i have be wondering how much they are?

Amy Ritterbusch said...

My mom has one too that was passed down in her family. It is black with pink roses. Very curious to know if it is worth anything. Still has the card inside that says it was manufactured in The Midlands by courageous British women.

Sally Atwell Williams said...

Just discovered this exact teapot in a cupboard in a house that I am now living in. This one is black, with gold on it, and not flowers, but gold circle around it with blue and white dots inside the circles - a great deal of "gingerbread". The lid does say For England and Democracy. And the bottom has the Staffordshire mark, with Made in England, the English Flag, and the lion, within the knots. Above the knot is "World War II", and beneath it is "Excorted to U.S.A. by Royal Navy" - it is also numbered. I too would like to know its worth.