Tuesday, February 10, 2009

BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY CONTROVERSY

Here's the latest news on the Brandeis museum controversy (see Kovels Komments, Feb. 4, 2009) that has our blog running overtime: Jehuda Reinharz, president of Brandeis, publicly apologized late last week. He said the Rose Museum will stay open but will "be more fully integrated into the university's mission." It will be a teaching site and a gallery, but not a public museum. He added that only a "minute number" of the artworks will be sold. Since this statement leaves many loopholes, we suggest that those who are involved make their decisions where they can be seen by the public--not at closed meetings at Brandeis. The decisions can have an impact on all universities, museums, art donors, and others. Here are some addresses you can use to register your complaints with those in charge at Brandeis. And we still welcome comments.

Art Supporter said...

Dear Terry, This concerned me so much, I e-mailed the university even though I have no connection to Brandeis. Here are a few e-mail addresses I used: 'gould@brandeis.edu'; 'hose@brandeis.edu'; 'yates@brandeis.edu'; 'Reinharz@brandeis.edu' in case other readers feel compelled to write to the university. Thanks for your concern and information.

Susan Jane said...

Here is a further article:"Inside Higher Ed" at: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/01/27/brandeis

There is a web petition--please sign!http://www.thepetitionsite.com/3/in-opposition-to-the-closing-of-the-rose-art-museum

I belong to a professional art librarians group and this has been circulated to us. Thanks.

1 comment:

abtexusa said...

Very interesting. Most donations to colleges have conditions tied to those gifts. I sincerely doubt that all of these paintings were donated without stipulations. If Brandeis sells the paintings in violation of the terms underwhich the gift was received, the successors of those donors would have the right to take the school to court. In addition, it would be a significant violation of ethics that could well endanger their Internal Revenue Code Section 501 tax-exempt status. And I have no doubt that their accrediting body would sanction them for ethics violations. What they are doing is a major violation of everything we college administrators hold dear.